Antarctica is melting faster than originally thought, new study finds

Antarctica is melting faster than originally thought, new study findsiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — While it’s no secret that the ice on Earth’s poles is melting, scientists are still learning about how rapidly these changes are happening.

Now a new study of water across the surface of Antarctica finds that the melting is occurring to a greater degree than previously thought.

“This study tells us there’s already a lot more melting going on than we thought,” co-author Robin Bell told Columbia University’s Earth Institute last week in a press release about the study. “When you turn up the temperature, it’s only going to increase.”

Researchers from Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory conducted the study and published their findings in the journal Nature on Wednesday.

 The scientists “found extensive drainages of meltwater” flowing in parts of Antarctica where they did not expect to find it, according to the Earth Institute’s press release.

Video provided by the Earth Institute, shows a 400-foot-wide waterfall draining a steady flow of turquoise water off the Nansen ice shelf and into the ocean.

 The Nansen ice shelf, which is on the southern side of the continent, is a mammoth glacier that stretches about 30 miles long and 10 miles wide, according to Geographic Names and Information Systems.

“This is not in the future — this is widespread now and has been for decades,” glaciologist Jonathan Kingslake told the Earth Institute. “I think most polar scientists have considered water moving across the surface of Antarctica to be extremely rare. But we found a lot of it, over very large areas.”

In January, scientists warned that a chunk of ice about the size of Delaware could soon break off the Larsen C ice shelf in northern Antarctica.

When the Delaware-sized chunk of ice breaks away, the Larsen C ice shelf could lose more than 10 percent of its area, according to Project MIDAS, a U.K.-based Antarctic research project.

The “event will fundamentally change the landscape of the Antarctic Peninsula,” Project MIDAS said.

Overwinterer at the Neumayer Station also support the #MarchForScience – our message of support from Antarctica! @ScienceMarchDC pic.twitter.com/7qObD39aY4

— AWI Medien (@AWI_de) April 22, 2017

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After controversial Hawaii comment, Sessions says ‘nobody has a sense of humor’

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions says people should lighten up about controversial comments he made earlier this week about the state of Hawaii.

When asked by ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos in an exclusive interview Sunday on This Week about why he referred to Hawaii as an “island in the Pacific,” Sessions responded “nobody has a sense of humor anymore.”

Sessions stirred up controversy this week when he referred to Hawaii as an “island in the Pacific” to conservative radio host Mark Levin on his program.

“I really am amazed that a judge sitting on an island in the Pacific can issue an order that stops the president from the United States what appears to be clearly his statutory and constitutional power,” Sessions said on the program Tuesday.

Sessions’ comments were referring to the Hawaii judge who issued a nationwide restraining order on President Trump’s revised executive order that calls for suspending the entire refugee program for 120 days and halting immigration from six countries in the Middle East and Africa for 90 days.

Sessions’ comments prompted backlash from Hawaii’s Democratic senators and representatives in Congress.

“The suggestion that being from Hawaii somehow disqualifies Judge Watson from performing his Constitutional duty is dangerous, ignorant, and prejudiced,” Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, said in a statement Thursday. “I am frankly dumbfounded that our nation’s top lawyer would attack our independent judiciary. But we shouldn’t be surprised. This is just the latest in the Trump Administration’s attacks against the very tenets of our Constitution and democracy.”

Hirono also tweeted, “Hey Jeff Sessions, this #IslandinthePacific has been the 50th state for going on 58 years. And we won’t succumb to your dog whistle politics.”

Hey Jeff Sessions, this #IslandinthePacific has been the 50th state for going on 58 years. And we won’t succumb to your dog whistle politics

— Senator Mazie Hirono (@maziehirono) April 20, 2017

When, Stephanopoulos pressed Sessions on This Week for a response to Hirono, asking “Why not just call it the state of Hawaii?” Sessions instead defended the administration’s actions, saying that the executive order is “lawful” and he plans to continue the fight to reinstate it.

“The president — nobody has a sense of humor anymore. Look. The president has to deal with the Department of Defense, the national intelligence agencies, CIA. He knows the threats to this country. He is responsible for protecting America,” the attorney general said. “This order is lawful. It’s within his authority constitutionally and explicit statutory authority. We’re going to defend that order all the way up. And so you do have a situation in which one judge out of 700 in America has stopped this order.

“I think it’s a mistake. And we’re going to battle in the courts and I think we’ll eventually win,” Sessions added.

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After controversial Hawaii comment, Sessions says ‘nobody has a sense of humor’

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions says people should lighten up about controversial comments he made earlier this week about the state of Hawaii.

When asked by ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos in an exclusive interview Sunday on This Week about why he referred to Hawaii as an “island in the Pacific,” Sessions responded “nobody has a sense of humor anymore.”

Sessions stirred up controversy this week when he referred to Hawaii as an “island in the Pacific” to conservative radio host Mark Levin on his program.

“I really am amazed that a judge sitting on an island in the Pacific can issue an order that stops the president from the United States what appears to be clearly his statutory and constitutional power,” Sessions said on the program Tuesday.

Sessions’ comments were referring to the Hawaii judge who issued a nationwide restraining order on President Trump’s revised executive order that calls for suspending the entire refugee program for 120 days and halting immigration from six countries in the Middle East and Africa for 90 days.

Sessions’ comments prompted backlash from Hawaii’s Democratic senators and representatives in Congress.

“The suggestion that being from Hawaii somehow disqualifies Judge Watson from performing his Constitutional duty is dangerous, ignorant, and prejudiced,” Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, said in a statement Thursday. “I am frankly dumbfounded that our nation’s top lawyer would attack our independent judiciary. But we shouldn’t be surprised. This is just the latest in the Trump Administration’s attacks against the very tenets of our Constitution and democracy.”

Hirono also tweeted, “Hey Jeff Sessions, this #IslandinthePacific has been the 50th state for going on 58 years. And we won’t succumb to your dog whistle politics.”

Hey Jeff Sessions, this #IslandinthePacific has been the 50th state for going on 58 years. And we won’t succumb to your dog whistle politics

— Senator Mazie Hirono (@maziehirono) April 20, 2017

When, Stephanopoulos pressed Sessions on This Week for a response to Hirono, asking “Why not just call it the state of Hawaii?” Sessions instead defended the administration’s actions, saying that the executive order is “lawful” and he plans to continue the fight to reinstate it.

“The president — nobody has a sense of humor anymore. Look. The president has to deal with the Department of Defense, the national intelligence agencies, CIA. He knows the threats to this country. He is responsible for protecting America,” the attorney general said. “This order is lawful. It’s within his authority constitutionally and explicit statutory authority. We’re going to defend that order all the way up. And so you do have a situation in which one judge out of 700 in America has stopped this order.

“I think it’s a mistake. And we’re going to battle in the courts and I think we’ll eventually win,” Sessions added.

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William, Kate and Harry carry message on mental health to London Marathon

William, Kate and Harry carry message on mental health to London MarathoniStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — Prince William, Princess Kate, and Prince Harry put their hands together to push the red button that started the London Marathon. The royal trio, who founded a charity that aims to break the stigma surrounding mental health, were on hand to support the runners at the starting line Sunday morning.

It’s #LondonMarathon day!

Whichever amazing cause you’re running for, let’s make this the #MentalHealth Marathon! #TeamHeadsTogether pic.twitter.com/sT3RxUa4Pa

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) April 23, 2017

Their charity, Heads Together, is the Virgin London Marathon’s official charity partner this year and 700 runners are participating in support of mental health awareness. The royal trio gave hugs to some competitors ahead of the race and, after the event got underway, clapped, cheered and handed out water along the route.

Good luck everyone with lots of cheers from the crowd & Their Royal Highnesses. #Teamheadstogether #LondonMarathon pic.twitter.com/YN4JpyhpYG

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) April 23, 2017

The runners got a surprise at Mile 22! #TeamHeadsTogether pic.twitter.com/qv3vckOydo

— Heads Together (@heads_together) April 23, 2017

An unprecedented security operation is underway to protect the runners and royals just weeks after a terror attack in Westminster left five dead and scores wounded. Hundreds of armed police with automatic weapons, sniffer dogs, and concrete and steel security barriers have been positioned in strategic locations along the route to prevent another Westminster-style vehicle attack. There are also major security checks in place surrounding St. James’ and the Mall leading to Buckingham Palace where more than 40,000 runners are vying to complete the grueling 26-mile course.

And away… they… GO! #Londonmarathon #bbcathletics pic.twitter.com/3TilyTzb7A

— BBC Sport (@BBCSport) April 23, 2017

WIlliam, Kate, and Harry dubbed the event the mental health marathon and many racers sported blue Heads Together headbands to support the cause. The young royals’ campaign to break the taboo surrounding mental health has had William, Kate, and Harry open up to the public about their own struggles. The normally stoic and reserved royals have shared some of their most intimate emotions to encourage others to seek help during moments of grief.

Earlier this week, Prince Harry,32, revealed for the first time that he sought counseling at his brother’s advice after nearly two decades of grief and difficulty coping following the death of his mother, Princess Diana, in 1997.

The fifth in line to the throne participated in a podcast with Bryony Gordon of The Telegraph newspaper. Prince Harry admitted shutting down all his emotions after his mother’s death. “My way of dealing with it was sticking my head in the sand, refusing to ever think about my mum, because, ‘Why would that help?’” he shared.

The weeklong campaign leading up to the marathon also saw Prince William discuss in a Facebook video with Lady Gaga her struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder. The prince and the pop star’s emotional chat encouraged young people to seek help for mental health challenges when they need it.

The young royals have worked with prominent doctors, educators and health care professionals across the spectrum as they engage in their most high-profile campaign to date

On Friday, William, Kate and Harry released a candid new video for their Heads Together campaign that shows them discussing some of the most personal issues they have faced, including parenting and coping with Princess Diana’s death.

Kate, 35, and William, 34, the parents of Princess Charlotte and Prince George, have opened up about the profound effects of becoming parents and the challenges they faced in the first few weeks after George was born in 2013.

William, Kate and Harry ‘s foundation has vowed to carry on their message beyond the marathon to benefit any young people, parents or veterans struggling with mental health issues and other challenges.

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